DERMAGRAFT
BIOENGINEERED FOR TOUGH DFUs

With living fibroblasts to build granulation tissue and a robust bioabsorbable scaffold, Dermagraft is uniquely designed for DFUs, even in weight-bearing patients.1-7

WITH LIVING HUMAN FIBROBLASTS, 
DERMAGRAFT HAS REAL BIOACTIVITY

  • Dermagraft contains healthy living fibroblasts, seeded on a bioabsorbable scaffold, that proliferate and produce growth factors, collagen, and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins to help build granulation tissue1-3,6
  • DFUs need healthy fibroblasts to help build granulation tissue and accelerate the healing process3,4
  • Growth factors and cytokines are essential for building granulation tissue and stimulating matrix deposition as well as angiogenesis6
See more about the importance of fibroblasts

The dermal substitute is made of metabolically active human fibroblasts seeded on a robust bioabsorbable scaffold during the manufacturing process.

These human fibroblasts proliferative, filling the interstices of the scaffold with collagen,

ECM proteins,

human growth factors,

and cytokines.

DERMAGRAFT'S 
BIOABSORBABLE SCAFFOLD IS ROBUST

  • The scaffold for Dermagraft's living fibroblasts is composed of polyglactin, which is a strong, absorbable biomaterial8,9
  • Some important facts about polyglactin mesh:
    • Stronger than collagen-based materials8,9
    • Broken down in vivo by hydrolysis, unlike collagen-based materials9-14
POLYGLACTIN MESH

is a robust, absorbable biomaterial and provides Dermagraft with its mechanical strength.8,9

HUMAN FIBROBLASTS

are seeded on the bioabsorbable mesh and proliferate to produce human collagen, ECM proteins, and growth factors/cytokines.2,3

HOW DERMAGRAFT WORKS

Dermagraft helps restore the compromised DFU dermal bed to facilitate healing by building granulation tissue and stimulating the patient's own epithelial cells to migrate and close the wound.7

Dermagraft, with living
human fibroblasts and a
robust bioabsorbable
scaffold, is placed on a
compromised wound bed
Granulation
tissue forms
Patient's own cells
are stimulated
to migrate and
close the wound

PRODUCT AND APPLICATION DETAILS

DESCRIPTION

  • Dermagraft is a cryopreserved human fibroblast-derived dermal substitute containing metabolically active human fibroblasts seeded on a bioabsorbable scaffold1
  • Human fibroblasts proliferate to produce human collagen, ECM proteins, human growth factors, and cytokines1
  • Dermagraft is FDA-approved to heal DFUs

INDICATIONS

Dermagraft is indicated for use in the treatment of full-thickness DFUs greater than 6 weeks duration that extend through the dermis but without tendon, muscle, joint capsule, or bone exposure. Dermagraft should be used in conjunction with standard wound care regimens and in patients who have adequate blood supply to the involved foot.1

APPLICATION

Dermagraft may be applied weekly for up to 8 applications over a 12-week period.1

REAL RESULTS IN 3 SIMPLE STEPS

*If not immediately ready for application,
Dermagraft may be held in saline for up to 30 minutes.
Dermagraft may be applied weekly for up
to 8 applications over a 12-week period.1

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Please refer to the Dermagraft Directions for Use for complete prescribing information.

REFERENCES:

  1. Dermagraft Directions for Use. Organogenesis Inc; 2015.
  2. Data on File -016 and -017. Organogenesis Inc.
  3. Bainbridge P. J Wound Care. 2013;22(8):407-412.
  4. Falanga V. Lancet. 2005;366:1736-1743.
  5. Broughton G, et al. Plast Reconstr Surg. 2006;117(Suppl):12S-34S.
  6. Roberts C, et al. Can J Plast Surg. 2002;10(Suppl A):6A-13A.
  7. Marston WA, et al. Diabetes Care. 2003;26(6):1701-1705.
  8. Conn J, et al. Am J Surg. 1974;128:19-23.
  9. Munton CGF, et al. Br J Ophthal. 1974;58:941-947.
  10. Deeken CR, Matthews BD. ISRN Surgery. 2013, Article ID 238067, 12 pages.
  11. Matlaga BF, et al. J Biomed Mat Res. 1983;17:185-197.
  12. Chattopadhyay S, et al. Biopolymers. 2014;101(8):821-833.
  13. Parenteau-Bareil R, et al. Materials. 2010;3:1863-1887.
  14. Tsugawa AJ, Verstraete FJM. Chapter 7 - Suture materials and biomaterials. In: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in Dogs and Cats. Elsevier, 2012, p69-78.